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Monthly Archives: April 2012

The Dark Knight Rises: Trailer 3 & Impressions

Many fans have been skeptical but holding high hopes for what’s already one of the summer’s biggest movies.  The first two trailers for The Dark Knight Rises were somewhat scarce on details, arguably less so than those for its predecessor.  But now we have our final trailer before the third and final (?) of Nolan’s Batman films comes out.

Rather than literally say what’s in the trailer (since I’d be doing a disservice in the process), here are some details that I’ve found, as well as my actual impressions.

The slow, opening play of piano is wonderful; chilling and immediately grabbing.

Bane’s voice has been much improved over the second trailer and the prologue.  His two lines in this trailer seem to emote differently, so that’s definitely a plus.

Compared to the final trailer for The Dark Knight, there’s a good chance Bane isn’t going to have as many lines as The Joker.  But it’s clear he’s still going to have a key part in the film.

The shot of the bridges blowing up followed by people looking out windows to see falling snow seems to indicate being alone or cut off.

We’ve seen snow (or something to replicate it) between the trailers and set photos, which can be associated with a colder nature.  The snow can also be paralleled to the fact Tim Burton’s Batman Returns took place during Christmas.

It’s essentially confirmed in the trailer that Selina Kyle/Catwoman (Anne Hathaway) knows Bane, which solidifies my early suspicion that she’s been directly involved with Bane.

The very end of the trailer also shows Batman and Catwoman in the new Batpod; sounds like a team-up to me.  What I’m guessing is that Selina/Catwoman is conflicted from her possible relationship with Bane, her life and maybe something Bruce offers her.  There’s also a brief shot that shows her in a fight and Batman fighting in the background.

Of course there’s also the concern about whether Bruce/Batman dies.  At one point in the trailer, Selina’s asked by Joseph Gordon-Levitt’s character “did he kill him?”  The finger seems to point at him referring to Bane killing Batman.  There’s also Batman responding to Catwoman ( “you’ve given them everything”) with “not everything.  Not yet.”  It might be a long shot, but perhaps Levitt’s questioning of Selina is right at or around the end.

And we finally see Lucius is going to be in the film.  Since none of the previous trailers showed him and the fact Lucius no longer works for Bruce, it makes me wonder how he’ll still fit in.

Given the shots we’re given throughout of chaos in the streets (not to mention the blowing up of bridges and a football field), it appears that the people of Gotham and Bane’s forces are going to at their very ends here.

The building music in the second half of the trailer transitioning to the Bane Chant is just pure bliss.  A popular move to use when teasing a finale such as this, but they often work and it’s no different in this trailer.

Those are just some of my quick thoughts.  I’m definitely looking forward to this film, the trailer has left me ecstatic beyond belief, and I’m looking forward to The Avengers even more just to see this trailer on the big screen.

What do you think?  Is The Dark Knight Rises going to be the number one film this summer?  Will it be nominated for any Academy Awards?  What observations or theories do you have?  Spill your thoughts below!

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Posted by on April 30, 2012 in Film, Movies

 

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Quote Review: Good Will Hunting (1997)

“I look at a piano, I see a bunch of keys, three pedals, and a box of wood. But Beethoven, Mozart, they saw it, they could just play.”

Those looking for a lesson in film speech and memorization won’t have to look much further than Good Will Hunting, which seems to have said aspects ready at every corner.  Sure, it’s not exactly plausible, but the actors do about as good a job as possible making everything feel down-to-earth all the while.

What did you think of Good Will Hunting?  Leave your thoughts in a comment below!

 
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Posted by on April 30, 2012 in Film, Film Review, Movie Review, Movies

 

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Parallels in Time: Terminator 2 to The Terminator

Most people re-watch the films they like, often on several occasions.  For many people, including myself, the first two Terminator films are probably among the most frequently watched films of all time.  And like a book that only gets better with each subsequent reading, viewers are bound to notice things they didn’t pick up on before.  Sometimes these can even be parallels from film to film.  Combine several viewings with one’s OCD tendencies and even the most arbitrary things will match up.  And because these are films that we’ll probably never get sick of talking about, here are some parallels I’ve noticed between James Cameron’s sci-fi companions, The Terminator and Terminator 2: Judgment Day.

Parallels are not a part of my mission.

Both films open with a scene from the future.

Kyle and Sarah make their getaway in a “late model gray Ford” (the film was released in ’84); the car which the T-800, Sarah and John escape with in Terminator 2 is a similarly styled sedan.

Both Sarah (in The Terminator) and John (in Terminator 2) are attacked by the Terminator sent to kill them through the windshield of a car; the main difference being Sarah was attacked from the front of a car and John from the back.

The way the T-800 in Terminator 2 is thrown through the glass in the mall parallels the way the T-800 in The Terminator was shot through the glass by Kyle at Tech Noir.

Sarah (in The Terminator) and John both initially drive cheap, low-end motorbikes.  John’s was a dirt bike while Sarah’s was a moped.

Both films end with a shot on the road.

Much of the key stretches in both movies take place at night.

In both films, Arnold attacks three individuals at the beginning; the three punks in The Terminator and three at the bar in Terminator 2 (the man he takes clothes from, the man who attacks him with a pool stick and the man who stabs him).

How dare you pick apart our redundancies.

Both films have three chase sequences, at least one of which (in each film) involves a large truck.

In the middle of both final chase scenes, (one of) the vehicles our heroes use to flee from the Terminator/T-1000 are toppled over.

During these same chase scenes, the person attempting to ward of the Terminator (Kyle in The Terminator, Sarah in Terminator 2) is injured by a gunshot.

During the last act of both films, each Terminator sent to kill chases our heroes with a motorcycle (if briefly).

The primary gun of choice used by the protectors sent back through time (Kyle in The Terminator, the T-800 in Terminator 2) in the first half of each film is a shotgun.

In both movies, Arnold attacks several cops.  In The Terminator he kills 17 of them; in Terminator 2 he does it to scare them off without actually killing any.

Both films take place over the course of roughly 1-2 days.

Seriously, how many more can you pick out?

Both films have us watch a (pre-recorded) video of a person who tells of their “visions of the future,” if you will.  In The Terminator, it’s Kyle, who’s actually experienced the war of the future.  In Terminator 2, it’s Sarah during one of her evaluations in which she sees/imagines the nuclear fire of Judgment Day.

Both films have a brief “FPS shot.”  In The Terminator, it’s right before Arnold bursts into the motel room Sarah and Kyle shared.  In Terminator 2, it’s in the steel mill when Arnold faces the T-1000 (who attacks right after the said shot).

The first words each protector from the future says to Sarah are “come with me if you want to live.”

Arnold briefly uses a younger male’s voice to disguise himself in both films.  In The Terminator, it’s of a cop (1L19); in Terminator 2, it’s of John.

In both films, Arnold loses his sunglasses by actions of a female character (Sarah running him off his motorcycle in The Terminator and a female cop hitting him in the face in Terminator 2).  This would be repeated two more times in Terminator 3, both involving confrontations with the T-X.

When Arnold says “I’ll be back,” in both films he returns by crashing a vehicle into a building.

Sarah has at least one nightmare/vision of the future in both films (she has two in the extended cut of Terminator 2).

You think you’re clever…

Both Terminators sent to assassinate send at least one person through a wall.

Both Terminators sent to assassinate also find out where the person they’re hunting is from a phone/transmitted message.  In The Terminator, it’s Ginger’s answering machine; in Terminator 2, it’s a cop radio at Miles Dyson’s house.

Including the extended cut of Terminator 2, each film has a scene where we literally get under the skin of Arnold as a Terminator.  In the first film, Arnold cuts one of his eyes off himself.  In Terminator 2’s extended cut, Sarah and John peel off part of Arnold’s head and drill into his head to access the CPU.

And just for kicks, the black guy in both films isn’t the first one to die!

Know of any parallels between the films I missed?  Let me (and others) know below in the comment section!

 
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Posted by on April 29, 2012 in Film, Movies

 

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Quote Review: Fast Five (2011)

 

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“Hell of a mess.”

You don’t need to be a fan of previous installments to enjoy Fast Five. In fact, all you really have to do is leave all logic and standards at the concession stand so that you can better enjoy it. Like most action films, it’s one that isn’t intended for being scrutinized, but rather one to get your adrenaline pumping. So as an enjoyable theater-going experience, the film is a terrific triumph.

What did you think of Fast Five?  Share your comments below!

 
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Posted by on April 27, 2012 in Uncategorized

 

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Quote Review: Girl, Interrupted (1999)

“So what’s your diag-nonsense?”

Angelina Jolie puts on one of her few truly compelling performances here, fitting into a character who isn’t too special by nature, but more by her means of delivery.  Not to be outdone, the rest of the cast are in fine shape as well.  Even when the film begins to feel more like any other mental hospital story, the performances are usually enough to balance things out so that interest is seldom lost.

What did you think of Girl, Interrupted?  Share your thoughts and leave a comment below!

 
 

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Quote Review: Fly Away Home (1996)

“We’re on the edge, my dear.”

A film that’s gone mostly unnoticed, which is a bit of a shame, even with a few parts bringing it down.  But the final act has some of the most mesmerizing and beautiful directing and cinematography, especially given its age. By the end it’s hard not to feel moved and inspired by what is, ultimately, a flawed but wonderfully crafted film.

What did you think of Fly Away Home?  Share your thoughts and leave a comment below!

 
 

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Quote Review: K-PAX (2001)

“You humans. Sometimes its hard to imagine how you’ve made it this far.”

K-PAX begins with some overbearing questions only to feel like an overly ambitious and cluttered blend of science fiction and drama. It ultimately amounts to bringing more to the table than it can handle, especially with the 2 hour runtime limiting so much. While some might argue for multiple potential interpretations to the ending, what culminates is fairly clear-cut.  In the end, it’s mostly another carpe diem/appreciate-life type of movie.

What did you think of K-PAX?  Share your thoughts and comment below!

 
 

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