RSS

Tag Archives: chase

Weekly Stumblings (12/10)

Here’s the latest in an ever-growing series of Weekly Stumblings.  I wonder how long it will be before I accidentally re-post something.

34 Two-Ingredient Recipes, because calling for any more than two demands a top chef: http://www.stumbleupon.com/su/1ayor4/www.buzzfeed.com/peggy/34-insanely-simple-two-ingredient-recipes/

That High, like an oven-baked cake flying over the Eiffel Tower: http://www.stumbleupon.com/su/4AIYms/alligator-sunglasses.com/post/36982386878/that-high/

20 Christmas Food Hacks for when you skimp out this holiday season (if you haven’t already): http://www.stumbleupon.com/su/9pd69k/www.nceasyfood.org/top-awesome-20-christmas-easy-food-hacks/

A Psychological Cold Reading coldly reminding you that you are not unique: http://www.stumbleupon.com/su/92cEAG/www.psychologistworld.com/cognitive/psychology_reading_test.php/

25 Tricks for You Daily Life.  You know, assuming your daily life is actually interesting: http://www.stumbleupon.com/su/8JPsMM/www.fullpunch.com/random/25-simply-awesome-tips-and-tricks-for-your-daily-life.html/

A DIY Filmmaker’s Toolkit.  Now you can show all those billion-dollar hacks how to make a real movie: http://www.stumbleupon.com/su/22CudP/wistia.com/blog/the-diy-filmmakers-toolkit?view=infographic/

And an R/C Car Race that might make Electronic Arts feel just a tad bashful: http://www.stumbleupon.com/su/1oblz7/carbuzz.com/news/2012/10/20/The-Greatest-R-C-Car-Chase-Ever-7711243/

Advertisements
 
Leave a comment

Posted by on December 11, 2012 in Blog

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Epic Movie Scenes: Stampede from The Lion King (SPOILER)

Here we have the first of many posts that I’ve decided to simply call “Epic Movie Scenes.”  Is this original or creative?  Not in the least bit.  But this is less about what I’m pointing to and more about what these sequences offer.  These are often the scenes that you almost have to see in theaters to truly experience.  But even if the scene doesn’t necessarily mandate that, they’re guaranteed to catch and keep your attention.  And given the post I made teasing this new feature, I figured why not start with one of the most iconic scenes from many of our childhoods?

Unfortunately, the poster of this video has disabled video embedding, but here’s the link to the video on YouTube itself.  And if you actually haven’t seen The Lion King yet, I beg you to just rent or buy the movie and watch it all yourself before seeing this specific clip (or reading ahead):

Why is it so epic?

Now rather than just touting and posting videos, I also want to set some space aside to talk about just what makes the scenes I post so great, spectacular and memorable.

Right from the first part of this clip we’re given an idea of just how big the scene will be with a shot of the steep gorge.  Then we have a nice, slow panning shot out of the gorge and showing the amount of wildebeest that will soon flock and dominate the scene.  And for one last touch of build up (and convenience to work in Scar’s favor), we hear Simba’s roar echo off the walls, immediately followed by the trembling stampede and easily one of the best “oh, ****” reactions on film.

So much is packed into this scene that it really makes for a better high point than the film’s (intended) climax at Pride Rock.  We see the villain’s plan come into play as the scene literally heads toward and ultimately around us.  There’s a perfect mix of tension and suspense as Simba clings to the weak tree which ultimately snaps as Mufasa heads into the quaking gorge.  And of course we have the gasp-inducing betrayal at the end by Scar, topped off with Jeremy Irons’ perfect, demonic delivery of the line “long live the king.”  It’s one thing to get a fast-paced action or chase scene, but to get one that legitimately brings emotion and investment in like this is something else entirely.

Another part that definitely helps sell this scene is Hans Zimmer’s composition, which was nicely handled and mostly untouched in the sound mixing.  I’m always of the belief that something as simple as a film score can make an ordinary scene come off as epic.  In this case we have an epic scene matched with epic music, and the results are staggering.

And if we needed any more reason to prove how monumental this scene remains, it apparently took 2-3 years just for the three minutes of footage.  Now THAT is dedication!

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on July 2, 2012 in Film, Movies

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Coming Soon: Epic Movie Scenes

We all know that feeling; what happens when the nerves under our skin gleefully sear and leave us paralyzed in our seats.  Whether it’s the panning of a wide-scale battle, every cut and shot in a pulsating chase sequence or the sheer effectiveness of underscoring perfectly set to the right moment, these are among the greatest, most powerful and memorable of scenes in film.

I’m of course referring to what can only be described as epic movie scenes.  What’s great about scenes is that so many can work on their own level–you can watch them outside of the rest of the movie and they’ll still strike you.  Even bad movies can have a scene or two of redemption which somehow makes it seem like less of a waste of time.

I’ll be compiling an ever-growing list of movie scenes to share with you.  Many of these will likely have spoilers, which will be marked in the post title.

In the meantime, here’s a mash-up trailer done by BMoneyrulz on YouTube:

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on June 29, 2012 in Film, Movies

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Parallels in Time: Terminator 2 to The Terminator

Most people re-watch the films they like, often on several occasions.  For many people, including myself, the first two Terminator films are probably among the most frequently watched films of all time.  And like a book that only gets better with each subsequent reading, viewers are bound to notice things they didn’t pick up on before.  Sometimes these can even be parallels from film to film.  Combine several viewings with one’s OCD tendencies and even the most arbitrary things will match up.  And because these are films that we’ll probably never get sick of talking about, here are some parallels I’ve noticed between James Cameron’s sci-fi companions, The Terminator and Terminator 2: Judgment Day.

Parallels are not a part of my mission.

Both films open with a scene from the future.

Kyle and Sarah make their getaway in a “late model gray Ford” (the film was released in ’84); the car which the T-800, Sarah and John escape with in Terminator 2 is a similarly styled sedan.

Both Sarah (in The Terminator) and John (in Terminator 2) are attacked by the Terminator sent to kill them through the windshield of a car; the main difference being Sarah was attacked from the front of a car and John from the back.

The way the T-800 in Terminator 2 is thrown through the glass in the mall parallels the way the T-800 in The Terminator was shot through the glass by Kyle at Tech Noir.

Sarah (in The Terminator) and John both initially drive cheap, low-end motorbikes.  John’s was a dirt bike while Sarah’s was a moped.

Both films end with a shot on the road.

Much of the key stretches in both movies take place at night.

In both films, Arnold attacks three individuals at the beginning; the three punks in The Terminator and three at the bar in Terminator 2 (the man he takes clothes from, the man who attacks him with a pool stick and the man who stabs him).

How dare you pick apart our redundancies.

Both films have three chase sequences, at least one of which (in each film) involves a large truck.

In the middle of both final chase scenes, (one of) the vehicles our heroes use to flee from the Terminator/T-1000 are toppled over.

During these same chase scenes, the person attempting to ward of the Terminator (Kyle in The Terminator, Sarah in Terminator 2) is injured by a gunshot.

During the last act of both films, each Terminator sent to kill chases our heroes with a motorcycle (if briefly).

The primary gun of choice used by the protectors sent back through time (Kyle in The Terminator, the T-800 in Terminator 2) in the first half of each film is a shotgun.

In both movies, Arnold attacks several cops.  In The Terminator he kills 17 of them; in Terminator 2 he does it to scare them off without actually killing any.

Both films take place over the course of roughly 1-2 days.

Seriously, how many more can you pick out?

Both films have us watch a (pre-recorded) video of a person who tells of their “visions of the future,” if you will.  In The Terminator, it’s Kyle, who’s actually experienced the war of the future.  In Terminator 2, it’s Sarah during one of her evaluations in which she sees/imagines the nuclear fire of Judgment Day.

Both films have a brief “FPS shot.”  In The Terminator, it’s right before Arnold bursts into the motel room Sarah and Kyle shared.  In Terminator 2, it’s in the steel mill when Arnold faces the T-1000 (who attacks right after the said shot).

The first words each protector from the future says to Sarah are “come with me if you want to live.”

Arnold briefly uses a younger male’s voice to disguise himself in both films.  In The Terminator, it’s of a cop (1L19); in Terminator 2, it’s of John.

In both films, Arnold loses his sunglasses by actions of a female character (Sarah running him off his motorcycle in The Terminator and a female cop hitting him in the face in Terminator 2).  This would be repeated two more times in Terminator 3, both involving confrontations with the T-X.

When Arnold says “I’ll be back,” in both films he returns by crashing a vehicle into a building.

Sarah has at least one nightmare/vision of the future in both films (she has two in the extended cut of Terminator 2).

You think you’re clever…

Both Terminators sent to assassinate send at least one person through a wall.

Both Terminators sent to assassinate also find out where the person they’re hunting is from a phone/transmitted message.  In The Terminator, it’s Ginger’s answering machine; in Terminator 2, it’s a cop radio at Miles Dyson’s house.

Including the extended cut of Terminator 2, each film has a scene where we literally get under the skin of Arnold as a Terminator.  In the first film, Arnold cuts one of his eyes off himself.  In Terminator 2’s extended cut, Sarah and John peel off part of Arnold’s head and drill into his head to access the CPU.

And just for kicks, the black guy in both films isn’t the first one to die!

Know of any parallels between the films I missed?  Let me (and others) know below in the comment section!

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on April 29, 2012 in Film, Movies

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Quote Review: Fast Five (2011)

 

Image

“Hell of a mess.”

You don’t need to be a fan of previous installments to enjoy Fast Five. In fact, all you really have to do is leave all logic and standards at the concession stand so that you can better enjoy it. Like most action films, it’s one that isn’t intended for being scrutinized, but rather one to get your adrenaline pumping. So as an enjoyable theater-going experience, the film is a terrific triumph.

What did you think of Fast Five?  Share your comments below!

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on April 27, 2012 in Uncategorized

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Quote Reviews: The Adventures of Tintin (2011)

“How’s your thirst for adventure, Captain?”

The story and themes are very much reminiscent of Indiana Jones and serve little beyond giving an action/adventure set up, but that’s precisely what Tintin is here to accomplish. Combine this with shockingly immaculate production, animation and top-notch editing, and we have a truly enjoyable experience that holds up for an optimal theatrical experience.

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on March 4, 2012 in Film Review, Movie Review

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Quote Review: Minority Report (2002)

“If there’s a flaw, it’s human. It always is.”

Minority Report’s themes and premise are really the extent of its potential. Though it’s science fiction, the movie still feels alien amongst Spielberg’s other works. And while the ending might seem a little too convenient, it at least manages to avoid being predictable. The rest of the runtime doesn’t fare so well, however, as it feels like a drag through events that offer little true suspense for the viewer with pacing that takes its toll well before the second act is finished. It doesn’t disqualify the movie from being a potential, worthwhile viewing, but its interest value is disappointingly weak.

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on March 4, 2012 in Film Review, Movie Review

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,