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Evan Williams Cinnamon Reserve Review

Cinnamon flavored alcohol seems to be slowly following in the footsteps of spiced rum; companies are beginning to spit their own takes out, bit by bit.  Goldschlager’s gone through somewhat of a surgence, we were treated to Fireball Whisky not too long ago, and even the latest offering from Malibu, Island Spiced, promises “caribbean rum infused with coconut, vanilla and a hint of cinnamon.”

And here we have Evan Williams, certainly no stranger to flavor-infused spirits.  They’ve already granted us affordable liqueurs in the form of Reserves (honey and cherry), each sharing their own bit of success.  Naturally, a new flavor has worked its way out of the distilleries and onto store shelves.  Cinnamon Reserve promises a “hot cinnamon taste” along with “a hint of fire and spice” and, if my time with Honey Reserve was any indication, one heck of a sticky, syrupy experience.

A picture of cinnamon churros with 2D flames is certainly eye-catching amidst aisles of black, white and brown labels.  The copper color of the full bottle proves to be misleading, as the spirit’s saturation quickly fades when poured, unlike the more consistent Honey Reserve.  On the nose there’s a definite cinnamon character (what a shock), though I can’t help but compare it to Fireball, which is far more forward.  It’s odd too, since Fireball is a cinnamon-infused whisky, while Evan Williams is merely a liqueur, so the bourbon-whiskey essence is played down.

If you gave me both Cinnamon Reserve and Fireball in a blind taste test without trying either beforehand, however, I’d have thought very differently.  Where a shot of Fireball tingles your mouth and taste buds like a tasty, spicy chicken wing, Evan Williams gives you a more straightforward cinnamon flavor with cordial and bourbon essence immediately on the finish.  More cinnamon briefly creeps back up, but it doesn’t stick around nearly long enough to leave a remotely strong impression.

Much like Crown Royal Maple, the cinnamon of Fireball felt like it was an actual part of the whiskey.  Yet with so much flavor, combined with a fairly tame amount of alcohol (66 proof), Fireball lacked the soul of a true whiskey.  What it offered instead was a rather refreshing experience, given the gimmicky premise.  Evan Williams, by comparison, wants to be a jack of all trades.  It wants to feed you the added flavor, but not so that cinnamon is the only thing it offers.  Sadly, the rest of the drink is not very worthwhile.  That lingering, syrupy character which Honey Reserve bathed in is present here, bringing out an experience that makes me suspect this stuff has high fructose corn syrup.  It doesn’t have this issue quite as bad as Honey Reserve, but without as much of a flavorful profile, it’s hard for me to be generous.

I hate turning this review into a comparison, but it’s damn-near inescapable.  Evan Williams have simply found themselves stuck on the backburner once again.  Honey Reserve was an ample supply of honey, but once considered alongside Wild Turkey’s American Honey, the lower price tag began to make even more sense.  Not that Honey Reserve was a bad product, it just didn’t have much of a place amongst vastly superior (Wild Turkey) and commendably different peers (Jack Daniel’s, Bushmills).  Cinnamon Reserve can at least enjoy the potential for more accessibility in recipes, though if my town is any indication, its not going to be the easiest bottle to find.  What we have here is a spirt that feels timid, afraid of giving us the flavor and experience touted on the very bottle.  It’s not a bad drink, per se, but when you can get a more authentic and fulfilling experience for literally the same price elsewhere, it’s tough to look at the glass half full.

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Posted by on March 23, 2013 in Alcohol, Alcohol, Blog, Drinks, Review

 

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Southern Comfort 100 Proof Liqueur Review

Personal note: My internet has been completely out the past week (thanks to terrible service and prices on AT&T and Comcast’s parts) and it won’t be restored until this coming Saturday at the earliest.  So until then it’s just my phone and occasional time at my friend’s place.

My experience with Southern Comfort has been a bit, how might you say, inconsistent.  The original batch is easily one of the sweetest hard alcohols you’ll find.  It makes sense, since even the 100 proof variant says that it’s a liqueur (go ahead, check the bottle).  For all its syrupy sweetness, Southern Comfort can be a very enjoyable drink on its own.  I even tried a sip of the Fiery Pepper variant and found it rather stomachable.  Now the Black Cherry flavor, that’s one which will forever live in infamy among my (empty) collection.

But I’m able to cast a putrid drink aside if other offerings are solid.  And since I’m a sucker for drinks that are intense and/or high in proof, I decided to grab a 100 proof bottle.  I figure it’ll either have more burn or less of sweet factor, which might make cocktails using 70 proof SoCo a bit more interesting.

The dark purple label and noticeably dimmer color help distinguish this bottle, not unlike Captain Morgan 100 Proof (though to more success).  To my surprise, upon opening the bottle, the scent isn’t terribly imposing.  On the nose I’m beginning to get some Black Cherry deja vu, bringing some ripe anxiety to the table.

I take a sip and the sweet flavor almost immediately gives way to the burn of the alcohol.  It very quickly goes from that heavy, almost dark peach flavor to the tangling burn of a comforting liquor as it massages your chest.  The drink is still very sweet, yet less dominant and cordial; in other words, it feels a bit more adult.  There’s still no mistaking this for an actual bourbon, and one shot of this can definitely leave your throat and mouth dry.  Whether the extra $5 is worth the climb is a question of personal preference.  If less sweetness and higher potency is what you want out of SoCo, then this is a viable option.  But if you enjoy SoCo the way it is, then I can think of little to persuade you to make a permanent jump up the proof ladder.

 
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Posted by on February 17, 2013 in Alcohol, Blog, Review

 

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Godiva Liqueur Review (Chocolate & White Chocolate)

Chocolate Liqueur Review

Great, now I’m reviewing alcohol.

I originally thought I’d be subjecting a more conventional bottle to my scrutiny, but while shopping, a couple little devils caught my eye.  For the longest time I’ve been curious about Godiva’s chocolate liqueur, but couldn’t see myself justifying the $30 price tag they come with.  This isn’t so much because of the beverage itself, but because of what other drinks I could mix it with in my collection (or lack thereof).  So I took the sampler’s route and bought a 50 milliliter bottle of the regular chocolate and white chocolate flavors.

It’s been a long time since I had Godiva chocolate, but given their name and reputation, this should be an interesting treat.  The bottles look nice, dark and elegant, almost like some high-class chocolate syrup.  Sometimes a really nice bottle is all it takes to catapult my attention.

Aesthetically, the regular chocolate variant looks like perfect chocolate milk, complete with a silky appearance and almost irish cream-like scent.  As I take an initial sip, the burn from the alcohol faintly lingers about my throat while the chocolate flavor gives off a mild personality.  The burn comes up more as I work my way, but becomes nonexistent on the finish.  I can’t help but think of irish cream mixed with chocolate syrup while I finish what little I have.  This is definitely something that could stand on its own as a post-dinner drink, like eggnog except you’re not limited to one time of the year.

White Chocolate Liqueur Review

Now, I love white chocolate.  I think it’s a bit of an unsung sweet that, when good, holds up on its own.  When paired with the right stuff it’s incredible, but they aren’t always so clear-cut.  It’s kind of like how I view Jameson whiskey–you really need to know what it can and can’t go with.  Needless to say, my hopes are quite high for this one.

Other than the white label, the bottle itself for this sample size is interchangeable.  A bit coy, really.  Once again, we’re talking silky smooth texture here, like a slightly thicker milk.  The burn from the alcohol is far less apparent to me, which is fitting with the mild flavor of white chocolate.  Much like how the chocolate flavor makes me think of irish cream, this one simply makes me think of milk (white chocolate milk, anyone?).  Because the flavor is so unimposing, I don’t really register the fact it’s white chocolate until the finish.

It’s probably my own bias, but on their own, I prefer the white chocolate flavor.  That said, I’m still pretty dry on recipes either of these could be used for, especially the white chocolate variant.  Other than a coffee or milk-esque drink, my creative juices simply aren’t flowing.  I enjoy both on their own, but I’m not so sure I’d shell out the price tag for a whole bottle of either one.

 
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Posted by on February 8, 2013 in Alcohol, Blog, Review

 

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